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Victims of Sandy Hook

Stop the Slaughter of Innocents. Congress is bought and paid for by gun lunatics and gun promotion groups. If you want to live in a safe America, help buy Congress back for America. Send a donation to Mayors Against Illegal Guns, 909 Third Avenue, 15th Floor New York, NY 10022

How to Write a Resume - Objective vs. Summary Statements

It's hard to write a resume. Most of us are not "born salespeople." Just mentioning the word "sales" usually sends a shiver of fear up our spines. Add to this the fact that we are taught from childhood that it's not polite to brag about ourselves it's no wonder that when you're asked to "sell yourself" on a resume you freeze up like a deer in the headlights.

So instead of panicking let's take a resume apart piece by piece and explain how to write an effective resume. Hopefully this will eliminate some of the fear involved in "selling yourself" on paper.

Resume Basics (what every resume MUST have)

Your name, address and phone number (obviously). But also your email address.

Email addresses are where most people tend to go wrong. I have a friend with an email address called "1hottiger" (one hot tiger). While this might be cute among friends, to a prospective employer it shows poor taste, and a lack of maturity (since she's in her late 40's). If you don't have a professional sounding email, create a new one just for your job search. You can get free email addresses on Google, Yahoo or Hotmail.

Example of a BAD email address:

ImAPartyGirl@email.com JennysMom@email.com 2Hot2Handle@email.com

Example of a GOOD email address:

MaryMartin@email.com M.Martin@email.com Mary.A.Martin@email.com


When you write a resume avoid using fancy fonts or colored ink. This just makes you look immature. Plus, statistics show that if someone has to struggle to read something they won't. Which means you're resume is guaranteed to hit the trash faster than most if you use a script font.

Try to make your resume look like a nice letterhead. One thing I do when I write a resume is condense lines. In the header I put my name to the left and my phone number all the way to the right. Then below that I put my full address (on one line) on the left and my email all the way to the right on the same line. Then I separate it all with a nice line to look like professional stationery.

When To Use An Objective Over A Summary:

The Objective Statement

An objective statement is for people who are either just starting out or changing careers. Your resume should state your desired job and field (engineering for instance) and demonstrate that you have the skills or education (if not the job background) for the position. When you write your resume make sure that you use "action words" in your objective statement. Just like they sound they convey that you are a person willing to get to work and do your best. It should state your skills, your desires and what you want to do FOR the employer.

The WRONG Way To State An Objective:

Looking for a position with a dynamic company that will recognize and use my talents. I am seeking a company that promotes from within and will recognize and reward hard work and talent. This statement is all about YOU. It gives the prospective employer no information about yourself that makes you stand out from the crowd. When you write your resume try to think from their position. They want someone that's gonna get in there and work hard to make THEM money. How will you do that?

The RIGHT Way to State An Objective:

To apply my knowledge acquired through my Masters degree in Graphic Design and internship at ABC Advertising Company to an entry level position in the art and marketing department of a major magazine.

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Careers Sections

The Right Job, Right Now: The Complete Toolkit for Finding Your Perfect Career

Complete Toolkit for Finding Your Perfect Career

The Right Job, Right Now presents a complete step-by-step plan for long-term career satisfaction using self-assessment, self-marketing, and a comprehensive job search and career development strategy.

Based on the author's Kaleidoscope Career Model, this book shows you how to take charge of your career and takes you, step-by-step, through the complete job search process including:

• Career assessment - what do you have to offer and what do you want in return?
• Taking action - searching for a new job, interviewing, and accepting offers.
• On-the-job issues - answers to common questions from dealing with a bad boss to performance management.

Click here for more information.

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