Have you always dreamed about working with music, but weren't sure where to look for jobs in music and the music industry? The good news is that there are a lot more jobs in music than most people think.
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How to Find Jobs in Music

Have you always dreamed about working with music, but weren't sure where to look for jobs in music and the music industry? The good news is that there are a lot more jobs in music than most people think. Performing positions include working with a studio band, playing with an orchestra and playing with a band at weddings, dances and local clubs.

Outside performing, there are many other jobs in music that help support musicians from education through selling their music. The bad news is that those jobs in music are a little harder to find than most jobs. If you're hoping to score yourself one of those jobs in music here are some hints and tips to help you along.

1. Yes, you'll find some jobs in music in the newspaper ads.

Look under Professional in the Sunday job listings for the best luck, but ads for companies hiring in the music business are few and far between. You'll have far better luck if you subscribe to some of the industry's professional papers and magazines. If you're looking for a job teaching music, for instance, regularly check the job listings in papers aimed at teachers and education professionals.

2. Internet job search sites are a good place to find jobs in music...

...but skip the big name sites. Monster.com and HotJobs! tend to attract hordes of applicants - which the music companies have already. One difference is music teaching and music therapy jobs. If you're looking for jobs in music therapy or education, the big boards are likely to have far more job leads for you than they will for performers.

The same holds true for those seeking jobs in accounting, management or advertising within the music industry. Even then, though, you'll have better luck at job sites aimed directly at performers and the music industry like PerformingJobs.com and findagig.com.

3. Do some research and approach the companies where you'd like to work directly.

It takes a lot of nerve, but then, that's what this business is all about, isn't it? If you're serious about finding jobs in music production, performance or promotion, you need to show the hiring agents you have what it takes.

If you can't promote yourself, why would they think you can promote someone else? Get out there and do your research to find record labels, production companies and indie companies that you'd like to work with, and then get your resume out into the hands of the people who make the hiring decisions.

4. For teaching and education jobs, approach school departments directly.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, jobs in music education are going to be one of the fastest growing segments of the music industry through 2014. If your ambition is to teach music, organize a school band or head up a school orchestra, the direct approach is the best.

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