There is currently a shortage of qualified Medical Transcriptionists - and demographic trends suggest that the outlook will continue to be favorable for some time to come. Consider the following benefits of becoming a professional Medical Transcriptionist.
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Medical Transcription Introduction

Medical Transcription is the process of converting voice dictation (typically either cassette or digital format) into a permanent written record utilizing word processing equipment and software.

Each day in hospitals all over the country, thousands of patients are admitted and discharged. Examinations are conducted, procedures are performed and recommendations are made. It is not uncommon for multiple physicians to be involved in a simple procedure for a single patient. Radiologists, Pathologists, Anesthesiologists, Surgeons, and a host of other medical specialists must all coordinate their efforts to ensure that patient care is both adequate and appropriate.

Underpinning all of these activities is a complex web of medical and patient information. Each patient-related activity and procedure must be meticulously documented and then added to the patient's permanent record. Physicians and medical record handlers alike must be extremely careful to ensure that detailed patient identification information accompanies each procedure and examination report to avert potentially disastrous mix-ups.

Over time, all of this information accumulates in a centralized medical records repository where it serves as a critical resource for patient care - facilitating accurate diagnoses and appropriate treatments. Indeed, timely patient care often hinges on the ability of Radiology, Pathology, and other specialty departments to quickly conduct their examinations and report their findings.

Evolution and History of Medical Transcription

In the past, patient medical charts consisted of a series of abbreviated handwritten notes that were funneled into the patient's file for interpretation by the primary physician responsible for diagnosing ailments and prescribing treatment. Ultimately, this hodge-podge of handwritten notes and typed reports was consolidated into a single patient file and physically stored along with thousands of other patient records in a wall of filing cabinets in the medical records department.

Whenever the need arose to review the records of a specific patient, the patient's file would be retrieved from the filing cabinet and delivered to the requesting physician. To enhance this manual process, many medical record documents were produced in duplicate or triplicate by means of carbon copy.

In recent years things have changed considerably. Walls of filing cabinets have given way to desktop computers connected to powerful mainframe systems where patient records are prepared and archived digitally. This digital format allows for immediate remote retrieval by any physician who is authorized to review the patient information. Reports are stored electronically and printed selectively as the need arises.

While the transition from a paper based to an electronic format will take years to complete, considerable progress has been made. Handwritten reports are largely a thing of the past. Verbal dictation is now by far the most common method for documenting and reporting the results of examinations and procedures. Physicians generally use either a cassette based voice dictation system or a digital voice dictation system to record their findings. Dictating reports verbally not only allows physicians to be more thorough in their reporting, it also saves them a great deal of time.

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